False-positive results released by direct-to-consumer genetic tests highlight the importance of clinical confirmation testing for appropriate patient care

The explosion of direct-to-consumer genetic testing over the last few years has created a ton of buzz, beyond just ancestry, health traits and wine preferences. Many of these DTC labs also release raw data to the consumer; this often leaves many individuals interested in what these findings mean and their potential impact on their healthcare management.  

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Ambry Genetics conducted a study, published March 22 in Genetics in Medicine, to assess how often the alterations detected in the raw data  of direct-to-consumer testing (DTC) were found to be false positives. Our results demonstrated a 40% false positive rate highlighting the importance of confirming DTC raw data alterations in a clinical laboratory that is experienced in complex alteration detection and classification, especially prior to making any medical management recommendations.

Check out the video below to learn more.

 



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The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this blog are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this blog is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog. Ambry Genetics Corporation does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this blog. Reliance on any information appearing on this blog is solely at your own risk.

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