• By Eve Mart
  • Posted November 20, 2017

Genetic Testing May Have Changed Things for My Mom

*Editor's Note:  In honor of Family History Day, which is on Thanksgiving, Eve Mart is sharing the story how hereditary cancer has shaped her relationship with her mother, and how genetic testing may have been able to help change the course of her mother's health.  I often tell women “be your own best advocate”, and I truly mean …


  • By Taylor Leigh
  • Posted November 10, 2017

Why Genetic Counselors are Integral to Ambry

In our more than 20 years of operation, Ambry has come a long way. Looking back, it’s important to remember that we would not be “Ambry Genetics” without our genetic counselors. Ambry is built on the foundation of quality genetic testing that helps people find answers – and genetic counselors have been with us from the beginning, working …


  • By Alexandria Meyer
  • Posted November 9, 2017

I am a Genetic Counselor- What Does That Mean?

“Genetic counselor” is not just a job title, though it is one that I have been enormously proud to carry for the past 10 years.  In that time, I have come to primarily think of “genetic counselor” as a term which embodies a skill set.  Just like Liam Neeson in “Taken,” we have a very special set of skills,  however, our skills allow …


  • By Desiree Magee
  • Posted November 8, 2017

Genetic Counselors: Companions on the Journey to Rare Disease Diagnosis

Our daughter Daphne started missing developmental milestones at around 6 months of age. She was unable to sit on her own and unwilling to eat baby food.  We started down the path of diagnosis, which was long and exhausting and went like this:  First, we went to our pediatrician to document our initial concerns and obtain referrals for a physical …


  • By Aaron Schmidt
  • Posted October 23, 2017

Ambry Contributes to the Genetic Community’s Scientific Knowledge at ASGH

Ambry strives to always present impactful research that moves the science of genetics forward at tradeshows and conferences throughout the year. Below, are summaries of the research we presented at this year's American Society of Human Genetic's Annual Meeting.  Black, M.H., et al: Type 2 Diabetes Variants Contribute to Breast Cancer …


  • By Souzan El-Eid, MD, FACS
  • Posted October 17, 2017

A Breast Cancer Surgeon Offers Perspective on Patient Care

An estimated 252,710 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017.1 Early detection of breast cancer is critical for successful treatment of this disease - women who are diagnosed with early stage/localized breast cancer have a 5-year survival rate of 98.9% 1 We hope that this Breast Cancer Awareness Month will inspire more people to discuss …


  • By Jessica Profato
  • Posted October 16, 2017

Identifying Patients with Lynch Syndrome: A Paired Somatic/Germline Testing Approach

Lynch syndrome is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes, affecting about 1/279-1/440 people in the U.S. It is caused by a genetic mutation in one of five genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, or EPCAM. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a significantly increased lifetime risk for multiple types of cancer including colorectal …


  • By Aaron Schmidt
  • Posted October 13, 2017

Ambry’s NSGC Research Paves the Way for Future Scientific Discovery, Clinical Practice Enhancements

In our quest to understand all human disease, Ambry employs a team of researchers who investigate topics from every area of genetics research. Throughout her tenure at Ambry, Zoe Powis, MS CGC, Supervisor of Clinical Genomics Research, has contributed much to the broader body of knowledge about the field of genetics. At this year’s National …


  • By Aaron Schmidt
  • Posted October 9, 2017

Ambry's Research at the National Society of Genetic Counselors 2017 Annual Meeting

We present impactful research to move the science of genetics forward at tradeshow and conferences throughout the year. Check out some of the research, separated by category below, that we brought to this year’s National Society of Genetic Counselor’s annual meeting. Read about the contributions from our lead researcher Zoe Powis and the …


  • By Laura Panos Smith
  • Posted October 4, 2017

Hereditary Cancer Tests: Is Bigger Always Better?

Just five short years ago, hereditary cancer testing was much simpler for patients and healthcare providers.  There were finite criteria, associated with a handful of genetic conditions, and healthcare providers could order single-gene (or single-syndrome) genetic testing for patients who met those criteria.  Since 2012, the field of genetics …


  • By James L. Wilder, MD
  • Posted September 11, 2017

The Benefits of Genetic Testing for Your GYN/ONC Practice

An estimated 22,440 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2017. Early detection is critical for successful treatment of this disease, which has a 5-year survival rate of 92.5% for women who are diagnosed with early stage/localized ovarian cancer.1 We hope that Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month will bring more women to their healthcare providers …


  • By Brian Helfand, MD, PhD
  • Posted September 7, 2017

How Genetic Testing Can Benefit Your Urology Practice

An estimated 161,360 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2017; early detection is critical for successful treatment of this disease.  We hope that Prostate Cancer Awareness Month will bring more men to their healthcare providers asking about prostate cancer screening or about their risk of developing this disease. Genetic testing for …


  • By Taylor Leigh
  • Posted August 15, 2017

Ambry Advances Understanding of Human Disease Through Epilepsy Gene Research

  At Ambry, we believe working together is better, that sharing data is essential to finding answers faster. Our scientists embody these beliefs by collaborating with other talented researchers and physicians to understand human disease, most recently in epilepsy genetics. We are proud to have contributed to the clinical research reviewed …


  • By Jessica Profato
  • Posted July 26, 2017

Why Paired Tumor/Germline Testing?

Germline genetic testing is used by many labs to evaluate a patient’s predisposition to hereditary cancer, and produces excellent results in its analysis of many genetic conditions. However, when germline testing is combined with tumor testing as a single paired test, it may yield even more helpful results in certain situations. Specifically, …


  • By Carin Espenschied
  • Posted June 29, 2017

What Happens When I Get My Genetic Test Results?

*Editor's Note: This post was originally shared on June 8th, 2016 and has been updated with current information.    Learning the results of genetic testing can be a stressful experience for some, but it also has the potential to be empowering.  If you are waiting for your genetic test results to come back or are considering …


  • By Pearl Yee, M.D.
  • Posted June 27, 2017

Physician Spotlight: Integrating Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Into Your OBGYN Practice

Genetic testing for hereditary cancer has evolved significantly over the past several years. We are continually learning more information about genes that are associated with increased risks for various cancers; and there are many different genetic tests available that can help you learn more precise information about your patients’ cancer risks, …


  • By Deepti Babu, MS, CGC
  • Posted May 18, 2017

How are Direct-to-Consumer and Medical-Grade Genetic Tests Different?

As we find more ways to take charge of our health, genetic testing is becoming something that many consider and, in fact, has become easier to access than ever before. An appointment with a doctor or genetic counselor is no longer required to access genetic testing – for some types of genetic tests, it’s now possible to order a test kit online, …


  • By Jonathan Rodis, MBA
  • Posted May 11, 2017

Living with Marfan Syndrome: Part 2 of 2

It’s now 1990, and I’ve now had my life-saving heart surgery. After spending nearly a month in the hospital with health complications, I was finally able to go home. After another month at home trying to recover, I decided to head back to work to continue the job and career that I worked long and hard to achieve in executive management and …


  • By Stephany Tandy-Connor, MS, CGC
  • Posted May 4, 2017

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: Taking the Trend to the Next Level…Responsibly

Our DNA tells a story — it tells us who we are. With advancements in genetic testing and an increased awareness in personalized healthcare, interest in direct-to-consumer (DTC) testing is on the rise. DTC genetic testing companies have made limited genetic testing for the general population readily accessible to healthy individuals. However, …


  • By Jacqueline Washle
  • Posted May 4, 2017

Surfing with a Purpose: How the Mauli Ola Foundation Helps People with Cystic Fibrosis

Editor’s Note: In honor of Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Month, we asked Jacqueline Washle, Ambry’s Community Outreach Manager, to tell us about the Mauli Ola Foundation, which supports people with cystic fibrosis and other inherited conditions as part of its mission. Did you know that going to the beach is not only a fun pastime for …


  • By Brittney Murray, MS, CGC
  • Posted April 27, 2017

Using Technology to Help with your Genetic Heart Disease Risk

Technology is everywhere.  It has become pervasive in our lives.  Phones and computers became smaller, smaller, and then somehow bigger and bigger again as our phones become our new computers. Increasing technological advances are also propelling healthcare: newer techniques, smarter robotics, and new drugs.  Within genetics, testing techniques …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted April 17, 2017

AmbryShare Extends Cohort Invite to Autism Clinicians and their Patients

Accurate genetic testing can help clinicians provide more individualized treatments for their patients, and the more genetic information a researcher has access to, the more targeted treatments can be developed. {Read: “For Your Breast Cancer Practice: Data From More Than 60,000 Refines Predisposition Gene Risks”} In March 2016, Ambry’s …


  • By Jonathan Rodis, MBA
  • Posted April 13, 2017

Living With Marfan Syndrome- Part 1 of 2

Editor’s Note: We are so pleased to continue introducing new voices into the Ambry patient blog. This week we are honored to have Jon Rodis, patient advocate, tell us what it was like to be diagnosed with Marfan syndrome, an inherited condition that can cause heart problems, many years ago – well before genetic testing became available …


  • By Deepti Babu, MS, CGC
  • Posted April 10, 2017

Can Patients with Hematological Cancer Have Genetic Testing?

The short answer is: Genetic testing is possible, but depends on other factors. The question of whether genetic testing is possible for patients with a history of hematological cancer comes up often in the clinical setting and in the testing laboratory. This makes sense since genetic testing is performed on DNA isolated from white blood cells …


  • By Tiffany Au
  • Posted April 6, 2017

What is Life Like for Someone with Autism? (Part 1 of 2)

Editor’s Note: To help support National Autism Awareness Month, we are sharing our interview with Kieran Best, a 14-year-old young man with an autism spectrum disorder.  Kieran graciously shared insights into what his day-to-day life is like and offered words of wisdom to others who may be in his situation. Check back in two weeks to read our …


  • By Deepti Babu, MS, CGC
  • Posted April 3, 2017

Current Genetic Testing Guidelines Miss Some Families with CDH1 Mutations

Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited cancer syndrome caused by CDH1 gene mutations. It occurs most frequently in Japan and eastern Asia; current incidence in the U.S. is estimated at 10-40 individuals per 100,000.1 Individuals with mutations in the CDH1 gene have up to an 80% lifetime risk of diffuse gastric …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted March 31, 2017

Ambry Experts Provide Insight on Genetic Testing’s Clinical Utility at the 2017 SSO Annual Cancer Symposium

Ambry has continued to provide clinicians with the most relevant and useful information to encourage education about the benefits of genetic testing for patients and ways to streamline genetic testing in clinical practice. At the 2017 SSO Annual Cancer Symposium, Ambry hosted the presentation “On the Cutting Edge: Sharpening Your Genetic Awareness …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted March 30, 2017

Ambry Talks Plans for Personalized Genomic Test Launch, Third Annual Trivia Night a Hit

On Thursday evening, March 23rd, an audience of more than 100 genetic counselors and geneticists from across the United States listened to Ambry Genetics’ Clinical Genomics Marketing Manager Layla Shahmirzadi, MS, CGC, discuss plans to launch a personalized genomic test for healthy individuals.  The talk took place at Events on Jackson venue …


  • By David Dubin
  • Posted March 30, 2017

Since You Asked, Here's My Advice to Cancer Patients

In my role as co-founder of AliveAndKickn, people ask me for my opinion all the time.  Topics range from how to manage pain, how to navigate post-cancer survivorship, to whether or not the U.S. will ever become a world soccer powerhouse.  (No, I’m not kidding.)  I’m not big on giving advice, but I try to answer as honestly as I can.   First, …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted March 30, 2017

Dr. Rachid Karam Discusses Variant Classification at 2017 ACMG Annual Meeting

Actionable medical results are often a key component in deciding a patient’s medical management and specialized treatment options. However, some genetic test results can have unclear implications or Variants of Unknown Significance (VUS), which can often affect a clinician’s medical management plans for their patients. During the 2017 ACMG …


  • By Kory Jasperson, MS,CGC
  • Posted March 23, 2017

How Expert Care Teams Can Help You - Repost

Editor’s Note: In recognition of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, we are re-posting this piece by an Ambry genetic counselor. His many years of clinical experience working with families affected by hereditary colorectal cancer helped him understand the importance of expert care teams, and how they can help you. My name is …


  • By Bill Rotter
  • Posted March 16, 2017

Why I Liquidated my Business to Advocate for Male Breast Cancer Awareness

Several years prior to my breast cancer diagnosis, I started to think about the right time to liquidate my business and sell the real estate. At the time, my brother and I owned two Ace hardware stores in the Milwaukee area with approximately 100,000-sq. ft. of retail space, warehouse and offices. I knew it would be a physically daunting undertaking …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted March 14, 2017

Four Reasons Why Genetic Testing Matters to the Individual with Colorectal Cancer

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States, and more than 95,000 new cases of colon cancer and 39,000 new cases of rectal cancer are estimated for 2017, according to the American Cancer Society. Up to 10% of colorectal cancer is hereditary, or caused by inherited gene mutations. Hereditary …


  • By Selvi Palaniappan, MS, CGC
  • Posted March 9, 2017

Individual Genetic Test Results Lead to Individual Considerations

As a genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics, I’m happy to be contributing to the Ambry patient blog during National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer can happen by chance, but it can also be inherited. Your doctor or genetic counselor can evaluate your family history to determine if you should consider genetic testing …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted March 2, 2017

RNA Labs—How they Impact the Medical World

Ribonucleic Acid, otherwise known as RNA, is the messenger that carries instructions for controlling the synthesis of proteins from Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). The central dogma of molecular biology states that “DNA makes RNA makes protein."  However, for the proteins, which are the final product, to work properly, the RNA needs to be “edited," …


  • By Georgia Hurst
  • Posted March 2, 2017

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month- Do you Know About Lynch Syndrome?

In honor of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, I would like to discuss the most common cause of hereditary colorectal and uterine cancer – Lynch syndrome. In fact, this post is dedicated to my brother Jimmy, who died of colon cancer due to Lynch syndrome at the age of 36. Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer condition passed down …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted January 18, 2017

'AmbrySpeaks' Tour kicks off in Los Angeles

Ever since our initial publication of Sanger sequencing confirmation was featured in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, in addition to our accompanying presentation at the National Society of Genetic Counselors conference last fall, Ambry has been touting our superior scientifically-proven genetic testing. Now we are bringing the message that …


  • By Tameron Harvell, RN, MSN, CFNP-BC
  • Posted December 22, 2016

You're Not To Blame

Editor’s Note: We are re-posting this entry by Tameron Harvell, a registered nurse practitioner, to raise the profile of “survivor’s guilt”  an issue that can be particularly challenging during the holidays. You’ve just received your cancer genetic testing results and no mutation was found! What a relief …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted November 10, 2016

These Are My Genetic Test Results… Please Don’t Shoot the Messenger

Editor’s Note: We are re-posting Theresa Smith’s entry to tie in with National Family History Day on Thanksgiving in two weeks in the U.S. Theresa was kind enough to update her piece on the importance of sharing family history and genetic test results, as challenging as it may be at times. Check back here in two weeks …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted October 20, 2016

Ambry Supports Breast Cancer Awareness Month throughout October

  In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, Ambry is proud to support many non-profit foundations and organizations, including the Mauli Ola Foundation’s 3rd annual Battle for the Breasts (B4TB). The B4TB is an online surf contest featuring 16 professional women surfers who are each paired with cancer clinics and/or foundations. Each …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted October 19, 2016

What is a Genetic Counselor?

Throughout the healthcare industry, it is known that genetic counselors play a vital role in the care and treatment of patients. Genetic counselors guide patients through the genetic testing journey and provide them and their primary care physician with detailed explanations of their test results. Check out our video that takes potential patients …


  • By Jackie Connor
  • Posted October 12, 2016

New Study Reflects Need for Genetic Testing for Prostate Cancer Patients

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) recently released a study, which concluded that 11.8% of metastatic prostate cancer cases were caused by germline gene mutations leading to hereditary prostate cancer. The study involved 692 men from the United States and United Kingdom who have documented metastatic prostate cancer. Eighty-four germline …


  • By Cynthia Rigali Lund
  • Posted September 29, 2016

In The Beginning: My Ovaries Were Talking, but I Wasn't Listening

What a perfect time to begin my story — we are in the middle of National Ovarian Cancer Awareness month, as well as National HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) Week. I love when things line up like it was all meant to be… Things did not line up for me in October of 2012. While preparing funeral arrangements for my dad …


  • By Michelle Jackson
  • Posted August 4, 2016

And Now, A Little Something For the Men Facing Hereditary Cancer

As a female genetic counselor, I can say I have counseled many men regarding their risk for hereditary cancer.  I have seen the different reactions and responses they have had. I have looked for different information (from what I provided to females) to give to them, if it will help. I cannot say I have any idea what it is like to be a man …


  • By Carin Espenschied
  • Posted August 3, 2016

How Laws Protect Genetic Information

There are many different things to consider when deciding whether to have genetic testing.  In addition to the impact of the test results on your physical and emotional health and that of your family members (more on that here), you should also consider your insurance coverage and the possibility of discrimination. When I met with patients …


  • By Tara Namey
  • Posted July 28, 2016

What to Expect Regarding Your Health Care Following the Identification of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Gene Mutation

When you learn that you have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, there are naturally questions as to what this will mean for your ongoing medical care and what you will need to do differently.    The initial conversation with your healthcare provider will likely include a discussion about the options available to more carefully …


  • By Carin Espenschied
  • Posted June 8, 2016

What Happens When I Get My Test Results

Learning the results of genetic testing can be a stressful experience for some, but it also has the potential to be empowering.  If you are waiting for your genetic test results to come back or are considering having genetic testing in the future, hopefully the information in this blog will ease some of the concern you may be experiencing. …


  • By Georgia Hurst
  • Posted June 6, 2016

The Importance of Genetic Counseling With Genetic Testing

As I sit in the hereditary cancer trenches, I see the negative effects of genetic testing sans certified genetic counseling every single day – and it is an enormous problem. Many of the fears and concerns that people discuss with me could be addressed and ameliorated simply if they spoke with a certified genetic counselor before …


  • By Carin Espenschied
  • Posted May 16, 2016

Adding Gastrointestinal Cancer Topics to our Blog

My name is Carin and I’m a genetic counselor at Ambry Genetics. I’ve been working at Ambry for about 2½ years and before that I worked as a clinical genetic counselor seeing patients at a cancer hospital for over six years. I have always had a special interest in hereditary gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Gastrointestinal cancers, …


  • By Georgia Hurst
  • Posted May 9, 2016

No Mud, No Lotus

Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh believes if people face and embrace their suffering, they will eventually grow from it and possibly turn it into something beautiful and meaningful... Hence the phrase: No mud, no lotus. Five years ago after I was diagnosed with Lynch syndrome, I found myself mired in mud – I had no idea what would emerge …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted April 28, 2016

What About The Men? Time For Us To " Man Up"

For a woman being diagnosed with a BRCA2 gene mutation, there is a ton of information specific to cancers for women, but what if you are a man? The amount regarding male breast cancer, hereditary prostate cancer, and hereditary pancreatic cancer is limited. In addition, public awareness about these conditions is limited. Considering …


  • By Bill Rotter
  • Posted April 26, 2016

Sharing My Diagnosis and Genetic Testing With Family and Friends

While it’s difficult for anyone to come to grips with a cancer diagnosis, it becomes more challenging having to share the news with family and friends. Especially when you are a man telling them you have breast cancer. People may look at you with a deer in the headlights stare….men get breast cancer? This was the reaction from many, as …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted April 22, 2016

Previvor’s Perspective – A Daughter’s Feelings

It was a year after I had tested positive for the BRCA2 gene mutation before I found out about the status of my three children. My oldest, my son, and my youngest daughter were both negative (huge relief). My middle daughter, Jenna, unfortunately tested positive for the same mutation I have. She is 23 years old now and is graduating …


  • By Michelle Jackson
  • Posted April 14, 2016

Male breast cancer is rare, but it’s not that rarely inherited

When I was a clinical genetic counselor, I met with many men who had been diagnosed with breast cancer for genetic counseling and genetic testing. Counseling male breast cancer patients about genetics was often very different for me than counseling female breast cancer patients. I think the main reason for that is men and women are different and …


  • By Carin Espenschied
  • Posted March 24, 2016

How Laws Protect Genetic Information ( Original)

There are many different things to consider when deciding whether to have genetic testing. In addition to the impact of the test results on your physical and emotional health and that of your family members (more on that here), you should also consider your insurance coverage and the possibility of discrimination. When I met with patients as …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted March 22, 2016

Hang on a Minute, Let’s Think This Through

After testing positive for a mutation in my BRCA2 gene, I was on high alert. I rushed to all my doctor’s appointments and gathered a lot of information regarding preventive surgery options. I also did a lot of research on the statistics and newer medical studies regarding BRCA1 and BRCA2. I evaluated everything based …


  • By Deepti Babu, MS, CGC
  • Posted March 10, 2016

It's Complicated: Sharing Your Genetic Test Results (Original)

I feel funny writing about sharing genetic test results when I’ve never done it myself, but don’t let that stop you from reading… I’ll draw upon my years in the clinic as a genetic counselor, speaking to many families about this topic, and offer thoughts from my side of the table. I have seen that it’s complicated for some families, …


  • By Jessica Profato
  • Posted March 3, 2016

I survived cancer, so why do I need genetic testing for it?

As As a clinical genetic counselor, I saw many cancer survivors for genetic counseling. In some cases, it had been 30-40 years since they were diagnosed. Some of them were in their 60s-70s when I saw them, but they were young at the time of their cancer diagnosis. Years later, they were referred to me to talk about the possibility that their …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted March 1, 2016

Being a Survivor Doesn’t Mean You Can Ignore Me

My mom was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1989, when breast cancer was still whispered about and long before Angelina Jolie put genetic testing on the Hollywood map. My mom complied with the treatment recommended for her at the time, which included a lumpectomy, chemotherapy and radiation. Eighteen years later, in 2007, I was 34 years old …


  • By Dr. Robina Smith
  • Posted February 18, 2016

Following Positive/High Risk Patients and Survivors

According to the National Cancer Institute SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) stat fact sheet on female breast cancer there were an estimated 12.3% of women living with breast cancer in the United States in 2012. 98.6% of breast cancer survivors diagnosed with early stage breast cancer are alive after 5 years or more. As early …


  • By Jessica Profato
  • Posted February 4, 2016

Coping with Cancer: 5 Lessons from my Patients

As a clinical genetic counselor, a big part of my job was educating my patients about the basics of genetics and hereditarycancer. Another equally, if not more, important part of my job was to talk to them about how a diagnosis of cancer, a positive genetic test result, or a combination of the two was impacting their life and those of their …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted February 2, 2016

Healthy Habits, Healthy Mind

The funny thing about ‘healthy habits’ is that you can do everything ‘right’, but there are no guarantees in life. For me, breast cancer is hereditary. he·red·i·tar·y Something (like a health problem, like cancer) that is due to inherited genetic changes (mutations), which can be passed from parent to child.  I have a BRCA1 gene …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted January 26, 2016

You want to take my ovaries out?

I was diagnosed with a BRCA2 gene mutation on August 1, 2013. My surgery for a complete preventive hysterectomy (to remove my ovaries, Fallopian tubes, cervix, and uterus) was just six weeks later on September 11. I requested to undergo BRCA1/2 genetic testing as a “tie breaker” to help me decide if I should have the surgery, …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted January 14, 2016

Watching and Waiting for Cancer

So I met all the doctors. What now? All the information and options were given to me, and it was overwhelming, to say the least. I was considering both preventive surgeries (full hysterectomy and preventive bilateral mastectomy (PBM) with reconstruction). I was playing the “odds versus timing” game in my head: “If I wait until I’m X years …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted December 22, 2015

The Results of Genetic Testing Impacts Lives

Before my breast cancer diagnosis, I had a brief conversation with my OB/GYN physician regarding my potentially increased breast cancer risk. I was coming up on my 35th birthday, and thought it might be responsible to schedule a baseline mammogram. I don't recall anything remarkable about that conversation with my doctor. She provided me with …