• By Jessica Profato
  • Posted June 8, 2018

I Survived Cancer, so Why do I Need Genetic Testing for it?

As a clinical genetic counselor, I saw many cancer survivors for genetic counseling. In some cases, it had been 30-40 years since they were diagnosed. Some of them were in their 60s-70s when I saw them, but they were young at the time of their cancer diagnosis. Years later, they were referred to me to talk about the possibility that their …


  • By Cynthia Rigali Lund
  • Posted December 1, 2016

Despite Cancer, Holiday Abundance Awaits

Editor's Note: This is a continuation of Cynthia's initial experience of being diagnosed with hereditary ovarian cancer in 2012, which she began to tell us in her post from September 29, 2016.   With an October diagnosis, the holiday season was going to be a new experience for our family of five. Although difficult in many ways, …


  • By Cynthia Rigali Lund
  • Posted September 29, 2016

In The Beginning: My Ovaries Were Talking, but I Wasn't Listening

What a perfect time to begin my story — we are in the middle of National Ovarian Cancer Awareness month, as well as National HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) Week. I love when things line up like it was all meant to be… Things did not line up for me in October of 2012. While preparing funeral arrangements for my dad …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted August 18, 2016

Putting Yourself First

  When it comes to putting yourself first, I’d say to anyone else, ‘DO IT!’ particularly to someone who’s been through treatment for breast cancer, which is the equivalent of being put through hell and back.  Truth be told, I need to practice more of what I preach. I often overextend myself on projects or requests made by others, and …


  • By Bill Rotter
  • Posted July 28, 2016

Ways The Ambry Genetics HBOC Patient Website Would Have Been Helpful After My Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Genetic Testing

I was diagnosed with breast cancer in December of 2013, and soon after learned I had inherited a gene mutation that was passed on from my father’s side of my family.  This overwhelming news was cause for great concern as much of what I had just learned was a lot to absorb.  I was the first in my family to be tested for BRCA1/2 gene mutations even …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted May 5, 2016

Fear of Recurrence and Mortality

I would imagine it’s normal to face some degree of depression, anxiety, and fear when cancer becomes a part of your life. I have always felt lucky that my cancer was caught early enough that the doctors were able to get it all out with my surgery and 8 chemotherapy treatments. I continued to undergo ovarian cancer screening until having …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted May 3, 2016

Personal Impact of Peer Support

As a breast cancer survivor I think I experience a bit of Survivor Guilt. I occasionally wonder, “Why me and not them?” Or rather, why hasn’t this disease been eradicated yet and why aren’t we ALL survivors?  It hurts me to the core to know that I will lose more friends and possibly even my mother to the same disease that I have been …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted April 19, 2016

Ride Marshaling at YSC Tour de Pink South

As I said in my last post: ”Breast cancer survivors share a connection, and I’ve come to learn that in some unconscious way by helping others, I’m helping myself to heal and spin a positive out of something that was negative.” This past weekend, I had the honor of ride marshaling at the Young Survival Coalition’s (YSC’s) inaugural Tour …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted March 29, 2016

Peer Support

I hadn’t set out to be the “go-to-girl” for all things breast cancer, but when you’re faced with a challenge and come out on the other side fairing pretty well, I think people trust you. Maybe they’re just looking for positive support wherever they can, when they find themselves in a similarly difficult spot. It starts with a phone …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted March 1, 2016

Being a Survivor Doesn’t Mean You Can Ignore Me

My mom was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1989, when breast cancer was still whispered about and long before Angelina Jolie put genetic testing on the Hollywood map. My mom complied with the treatment recommended for her at the time, which included a lumpectomy, chemotherapy and radiation. Eighteen years later, in 2007, I was 34 years old …


  • By Theresa Smith
  • Posted February 23, 2016

What about my “foobies” surgery?

I did finally come to terms with my decision to have a preventive bilateral mastectomy to lower my risk of breast cancer from my BRCA2 gene mutation. I was scheduled with my surgeon, but I was put on a rolling schedule, which meant my date was not set in stone. I asked at what point I got to keep my surgery date, instead of my date being …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted February 16, 2016

Treatment to Survivor

Being a breast cancer survivor isn’t a static label. For me, being a breast cancer survivor has added another layer to the person I am and have become, and that has been an evolutionary process. It took time to get my energy back, but I now happily maintain a very active lifestyle. Again, it took time, and patience was not my strong suit.  …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted February 2, 2016

Healthy Habits, Healthy Mind

The funny thing about ‘healthy habits’ is that you can do everything ‘right’, but there are no guarantees in life. For me, breast cancer is hereditary. he·red·i·tar·y Something (like a health problem, like cancer) that is due to inherited genetic changes (mutations), which can be passed from parent to child.  I have a BRCA1 gene …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted January 19, 2016

Giving Back and Paying it Forward

Having been directly affected by breast cancer, it would be impossible to expect that it hasn’t altered my perspective on the important, and not so important, things in life. I feel an intense need to pay it forward or, shall I say, give back. I’ve lost several friends to the very same disease, and now my mother lives with metastatic breast …


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted December 9, 2015

"Five minutes ago, I was having lunch... and now I have cancer?"

My name is Eve and I am a breast cancer survivor. Sounds like an introduction at an AA meeting. Let's try this again... my name is Eve and I am a vivacious, animal loving, bicycle riding, paddle boarding, educated professional who happens to also be a 7-year breast cancer survivor at the age of 42. Sound better? Being a breast cancer survivor …