• By Catherine Schultz, MS, CGC
  • Posted March 23, 2023

Ambry Genetics Diagnostic Dilemma: +RNAinsight® Reveals Lynch Syndrome in Sisters

In recognition of Colon Cancer Awareness Month, Ambry would like to share the story of Jane and Julie Smith (not their real names) – sisters and cancer survivors. Jane was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2004 at the age of 36. While she was concerned about her diagnosis and family history of ovarian cancer, genetic testing was not widely available…


  • By Jodi Tahsler
  • Posted March 8, 2023

International Women’s Day: Spotlighting Cathrine Keller, MD, A Woman of Substance

Being a “woman of substance” requires a passion for benefitting the greater good. Dr. Cathrine Keller has it in abundance. “We believe the greater good is to put our patients’ health and safety at the epicenter of every decision we make.” A woman of substance seldom has a neutral position. As a leader in the fight against breast cancer,…


  • By Jaime Burguieres
  • Posted September 29, 2022

An Attitude of Gratitude: Jaime Burguieres’ Previvor Cancer Journey Guided by Ambry Genetic Testing

When Jaime Burguieres was young, her 43-year-old maternal aunt was diagnosed with breast cancer. Burguieres watched her vivacious aunt go through painful radiation and chemotherapy treatments that seemingly eradicated her cancer at the time. A few years later, her aunt was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in the breast, stomach, and hip,…


  • By Emily Huebsch
  • Posted September 27, 2022

A Different Kind of Patient: Emily Huebsch Empowers Herself and Others Against Breast Cancer

Previvor: A person who has not been diagnosed with cancer, but has survived the predisposition, or higher risk, due to certain genetic mutations.* Breast cancer. Spoken in hushed tones, these scary words are often compounded by the aftermath of breast cancer deaths, creating a stigma around discussing breast cancer in regular conversations. With…


  • By Jessica Profato, MS, CGC
  • Posted January 4, 2019

3 Common Questions from Healthcare Providers about Genetic Testing

An estimated 266,000 women and 2,500 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year alone, and up to 10% of these may be hereditary. That’s over 26,000 patients and families whose lives could be significantly impacted by genetic testing, which can help guide personalized risk counseling and medical management. Multigene panels, like BreastNext,…


  • By Carrie Horton, MS, CGC
  • Posted October 3, 2018

Science In 60: Looking Beyond BRCA 1/2 to Identify Women at Risk for Breast Cancer

The adoption of multi-gene panel testing (MGPT) has been a game changer in the hereditary breast cancer arena. As evidence surrounding the growing number of breast cancer predisposition genes has accumulated, ATM, CHEK2, and PALB2 have stood out and become undisputed susceptibility genes conferring a moderate risk for…


  • By Erin Danielle
  • Posted June 4, 2018

Strength and Survivorship: Honoring National Cancer Survivor's Day

From the moment I was diagnosed with breast cancer I knew there was something bigger out there for me. I've always believed that. I trusted that my cancer journey would bring me just one step towards whatever that 'bigger' is in my life. I’m a 37 year-old single mom to an incredible, hockey-playing, boxing 10 year-old boy, and about three years…


  • By Eve Mart
  • Posted November 20, 2017

Genetic Testing May Have Changed Things for My Mom

*Editor's Note: In honor of Family History Day, which is on Thanksgiving, Eve Mart is sharing the story how hereditary cancer has shaped her relationship with her mother, and how genetic testing may have been able to help change the course of her mother's health. I often tell women “be your own best advocate”, and I truly mean it.…


  • By Valerie Smart
  • Posted October 24, 2017

An 18-Year Survivor of Breast Cancer Shares Her Story

My name is Valerie Smart. I’m a wife and mother with three beautiful children, two boys and a girl. And I am an 18 year breast cancer survivor. This is my story. I was diagnosed with a stage II ductal carcinoma (a type of breast cancer) in August of 2000. I had eight cycles of chemotherapy and 30 days of radiation followed by Tamoxifin. I lost…


  • By Nicole Schweppe
  • Posted October 18, 2017

My Breast Cancer Journey, Part 2- How I Prepared for Chemotherapy

I like to prepare for the worst but hope for best. When I started chemotherapy for my breast cancer, I knew what it meant for my hair and body. I was aware of the side effects and what each cycle could bring. To physically get my body ready for chemo I did a few things that might sound trite or shallow, but I knew they would help me feel somewhat…